Author Archive

Why Identifying as a Project Business is Critical For Success

February 18, 2020

The following article is the first of four in a series on ‘Project Business’ and is authored by Daniel Bévort

I have long commented on, and grumbled about if I am honest, that most project conversations talk about internal projects and not external, client facing, business oriented projects – both of which are important but with the latter representing most of my personal career experience.

As such I am delighted to share these articles with you.

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How would you categorize construction, architecture and engineering companies? If you think about it, the construction, architecture and engineering part of it is just about the type of projects they do. Essentially, these companies are Project Businesses, companies that provide products or services for their customers through projects.

Project Business is an industry just like Retail and Manufacturing because projects are their primary business function. For example, if we think of a Retail Business, it’s about reselling goods to consumers. It doesn’t matter what goods you sell. Whatever it is, if you sell it to consumers, you are a Retail Business. The same goes for a Manufacturing Business. It doesn’t matter what products you make, if you manufacture it, you are a Manufacturing Business.

Project Business is the same. Whatever the product or service is, if you are running and delivering projects to your customers, you are a Project Business.

Project Management as a Central Component of a Project Business

Oftentimes, people think managing a project and managing a project business are interchangeable. They’re not. Project Management is something that a business does, regardless of the type of business it is. Project Management applies knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to complete projects and is a central component of a Project Business. Since projects are temporary, managing a project is also temporary. On the other hand, Project Business is enduring and as such, managing a Project Business is an enduring activity.

Characteristics of Project Businesses

Although we can compare Project Business to traditional industries like Retail, Distribution or Manufacturing, there are several major characteristics unique to Project Business. Unlike traditional industries:

·       Projects are Temporary and Unique to Each Customer

Retail, Distribution and Manufacturing companies produce or sell the same goods repeatedly. This allows these companies to take advantage of standardized processes and KPIs, automation, and economies of scale more easily than Project Businesses. As a result, these traditional businesses are more predictable and can replicate procedures and processes easier than Project Businesses.

·       Project Business Processes Can Differ Depending on Who Is Doing Them

In traditional industries, processes and data are standardized no matter who is doing the work. In a Project Business, it all depends on who is executing the task. With the amount of detail included in a specific project plan, processes can differ between different project managers who have different preferences. Even the data that is considered important and used to make critical business decisions can be different across the company. This makes Project Business more complex than traditional businesses. Since project business processes aren’t uniform, it’s difficult to manage the business functions and establish standard metrics to measure performance.

With all that in mind, it’s no surprise we’ve seen productivity in traditional sectors continue to grow while it has remained stagnant in Project Businesses. This increase in productivity has largely been attributed to technology. It’s a lot easier to apply technology to standardized processes and data in order to automate and increase production. However, it’s not so easy with Project Businesses that have unique products and non-standard business practices.

Identifying as a Project Business is Key to Growth & Success

In order to improve productivity and optimize your business for success, it’s important to first identify as a Project Business. Once you do that, it’s easier to see how you can improve, structure your project business processes, and identify what systems and solutions are possible.

Project Businesses need to govern their business activities in the same way traditional industries have. More specifically, they need to be able to control their business processes to optimize business performance. Let’s look at the core activities for a project business.

Project Businesses engage in the following activities:

·       Project Management & Operations– Scheduling, resource management, change control, risk & issue management, time and expense

·       Project Financials & Accounting– Costing & estimating, budgeting, cost control, EAC/BAC, cash flow management

·       Project Analytics– Earned value analysis & management, forecasting, KPIs, profitability

·       General– Project-owner collaboration, portfolio/program management, HR management, sales, customer service, business intelligence and financials

When your business depends on the successful delivery of projects to your customers, it’s critical to be on point. Recognizing your company as a Project Business is the first step to setting the foundation for expansion, growth and profitability. Failing to identify as a Project Business will lead to challenges in business productivity and performance. The next blog in our four-part Project Business series will take a deep dive into why productivity is failing Project Businesses and what is the solution.

Peter: This is also something my friend Oliver F. Lehmann would acknowledge and support through his Project Business Foundation https://www.linkedin.com/company/project-business-foundation/

Daniel Bévort: Founder & CEO

Prior to founding ADEACA, Daniel was a principal architect of Axapta at Damgaard Data, which was acquired by Microsoft in 2002 for $1.6B and became Microsoft’s ERP offering, now called Dynamics 365 Finance & Operations. Daniel recognized that every traditional industry has systems to integrate and control all their business processes, but that is not the case for project-based industries. ADEACA was founded to accomplish that same vision for these neglected industries and find a way to run project business with real-time information and much better control.

From ‘Lazy’ to ‘Agile’ Project Management

February 10, 2020

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/pm-master-class-from-lazy-to-agile-project-management-tickets-88822533589?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

This one day workshop is being delivered in Geneva on 27th February, a few places left only – see link above

 

Or talk to Peter Taylor about delivering it for your project team http://www.thelazyprojectmanager.com

Benefits:

At the conclusion of this full-day interactive classroom training, you will be able to:

  • Understand the ‘backbone’ of smart/agile working whilst managing projects
  • Identify ways to apply the concept of working smarter, not harder
  • Apply personal efforts where it matters most on a project
  • Work with team members in a more productive way
  • Be effectively ‘Agile’
  • Communicate more effectively with the entire project team

Event description

The ‘Lazy’ project management way is all about ‘working smarter and not harder’ and this aligns perfectly with the ‘Agile’ way of project management:

  • Customer Satisfaction – this is simply about the true fulfilment of customer needs and demands, achieved through the continuous and on-time delivery
  • Changing Requirements – we all know project requirements change and in order to accommodate these ad hoc changes we need to get iterative
  • Frequent Delivery – there is a greater preference given to timescales that span a shorter period of time but align to deliver the full project
  • A measure of Progress – output should be focused on fastest time to value and minimum viable outcome
  • Development – encourage working in short productive burst rather than a prolonged and seemingly never-ending journey
  • Close Co-operation – management and the executives, specialist need to work cordially to make an impact on the project on a daily basis
  • Motivated Individuals – providing the environment needed to thrive in a collaborative way

This workshop will focus on these key areas and explore the project lifecycle to see where the ‘Lazy’, the ‘Smart’ and the ‘Agile’ can be effectively exploited.

Who should attend:

  • Project Managers
  • Senior PM practitioners
  • Project Administrators
  • PMO staff
  • Team members

Take me to your Leader

January 30, 2020

Make an introduction to your Head of Projects, Services Lead, PMO Manager, CIO or anyone overseeing your project community and I’ll send a free copy of my new book to you and your manager/director/VP

Leader

 

Coming to Switzerland

January 7, 2020

Switzerland

I’m heading to Switzerland on 26th and 27th February for a series of presentations/workshops – details to follow – but if you are interested in an in-house session for your company around those dates then just let me know.

See http://www.thelazyprojectmanager.com for my offerings – let’s talk today

An experienced Change and Transformation Specialist who has operated at a global scale within many industries, for organisations ranging from small to enterprise.

Peter is the author of the number 1 bestselling project management book ‘The Lazy Project Manager’, along with many other books on Project Management, PMO development, Executive Sponsorship, Transformation Leadership, and Speaking Skills.

He has delivered over 350 lectures around the world in over 25 countries and has been described as ‘perhaps the most entertaining and inspiring speaker in the project management world today’.

Key strengths include: Embedding robust governance to ensure successful delivery of £multi-million change programmes and working with stakeholders throughout the project life-cycle to ensure delivery of tangible business benefits; as well as introducing best practice processes aligned with an organisation’s culture and maturity. Working across multiple industries including Manufacturing, Health, Pharmaceuticals, FMCG, Aerospace, HR, Public Sector, Education and Finance. Deep understanding of the project economy world and internal/external stakeholder interaction. PMO design, build and re-engineering expert. Strong communication skills and the ability to engage effectively at all levels within an organisation, shop-floor to board level.

www.thelazyprojectmanager.com

New Presentations for 2020

January 3, 2020

It has been 10 years since The Lazy Project Manager was published and I have had the pleasure of presenting on this topic in 25 countries so far, but now, at the start of a new year, 2020 no less, I have decided that this will be the last year that I deliver ‘The Lazy Project Manager’ keynote.

So you only have 12 months to book me if you haven’t heard this one before, or you want to hear it again.

You can see below the presentation outline.

But, of course, this means that there is room for some new material as well and I am delighted to share three new presentations/keynotes that I will be presenting in 2020 (and beyond).

Firstly, Project Management: It’s all Bollocks! (Based on a new book for 2020)

Welcome to Project Management: It’s All Bollocks! where we will all pick over the sadly inadequate body of knowledge that is project management today, and generally challenge just about everything, eliminating that which you don’t need to bother to learn about, or should already know, leaving you only with the parts that will give you the results you want.

The project management profession continues to grow and mature, but is at risk of excluding those who don’t fit the mould. There is a mystique out there that only certificated project managers can be project managers. This is nonsense. The project management skill set is accessible to anyone, and how you choose to access it and put it to use should remain the decision of the individual. There shouldn’t be a right or wrong choice. This book is targeted at those ‘projects as usual project managers’ who will drive most of the change inside organisations tomorrow and beyond, and who really need help to do that.

Here we offer up a selection of seven cracking ideas, that when applied to a project environment will ultimately result in you being a good manager of projects in this modern world of business complexity.

And then, Business Agile: A Roadmap for Transforming your Management and adapting to the VUCA Environment

Business agile is an approach that gives the right business flexibility and fast decision-making in a volatile environment, providing a great capacity for innovation, adaptation and change. Businesses everywhere are trying to “get business agile”—but it’s not easy to adapt to becoming this adaptive. How can conventional organisations succeed in this transformation?

In this presentation, we will walk through the change process step by step, and look at a tried and tested transformation roadmap: benefits are outlined, solutions to common challenges offered, and tried and tested methods and tools provided. It will be a guide towards a decentralised and management style that offers more successful decision making through collaboration.

By reducing processes, adjusting the governance and believing in “the power of the people” to deliver simple success in a time of complex demand, all will help any business leader guide their management team and change agents get productively business agile.

And finally, Lessons Learned from my Travels: Change Management learned in the air, in the car and by rail over a ten year period

With ten years, 25 countries and over 350 presentations to my credit, I have experienced the good, the bad, and the damn right ugly of travel but, once the pain is a distant memory, there are some amazing lessons that can be learned.

From 40 minutes to board in Germany, to snow in London, from biscuits in Ireland, to coffee on the ceiling in the USA, and many more, this is a fun, amusing, ‘thank god it never happened to me’ roller coaster of a presentation with some real lessons on change delivery at the heart of each true story.

Buckle up and join me!

And let’s not forget that golden oldie

‘Progress isn’t made by early risers. It’s made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something’

Learn about the art of productive laziness with The Lazy Project Manager; understanding what is meant by the ‘productive lazy’ approach to Projects (and life) and learn how to apply these lessons ‘to be twice as productive and still leave the office early’.

The session will cover the definition of productive laziness, the science behind the theory (yes there really is some), and will share some personal learning experiences that led to the creation of ‘The Lazy Project Manager’. In addition, the audience will consider the three key project stages, one of which the ‘lazy’ project manager works very hard in and the second they should be in the comfortable position of enjoying the ‘comfy chair’ safe in the knowledge that the project is well under control and the final where often some critical work is missed.

Project Management: It’s all Bollocks! The complete exposure of the world of, and the value of, project management is a new book by Susie Palmer-Trew and Peter Taylor and is available now https://www.routledge.com/Project-Management-Its-All-Bollocks-The-Complete-Exposure-of-the-World/Palmer-Trew-Taylor/p/book/9780367140908

Presentation Skills Training 2020

January 2, 2020

Peter Taylor is the author of two best-selling books on ‘Productive Laziness’ – ‘The Lazy Winner’ and ‘The Lazy Project Manager’.

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In the last 10 years he has focused on writing and lecturing with over 350 presentations around the world in over 25 countries. He has been described as ‘perhaps the most entertaining and inspiring speaker in the project management world today’.

Based on his experience in travelling the world and speaking to over 80,000 people Peter has developed his own ‘Presentation Skills’ training.

THE NEXT PUBLIC COURSE WILL BE IN LONDON ON 30th JANUARY 2020

so book your place today by contacting Peter through LinkedIn or through his website http://www.thelazyprojectmanager.com

Limited to 10 attendees, for maximise focus and benefit to you – price is only £300 (payable at time of booking)

WORKSHOP

The one-day workshop takes you on a journey of understanding as to what makes a good presentation and how you can improve your own style and skills.

Agenda – 9am to 5pm

  • Introductions – through a simple presentation
  • Presentation on Presentations – Best practice
  • Discussion of issues, concerns, challenges etc
  • The journey of a Presentation
  • Development of presentations (each student) with structured guidance
  • Review, improvements, enhancements
  • Re-Present
  • Lessons learned – next steps
  • Close

Post-workshop coaching (1 hour per student) to prepare your for your next presentation

BOOK

And you will get a copy of Peter’s book ‘The Presentation on Presentations’

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BENEFITS

  • Practical shared experience from a world class keynote speaker
  • Post-workshop coaching to prepare you for your next presentation
  • Absolutely no deaths by PowerPoint guaranteed

RECOMMENDATIONS

‘Peter is a powerful, passionate and persuasive speaker’

‘If you are looking for a terrific presenter for your event, I highly recommend Peter’

‘Peter’s inspiring style and humour made him one of the top contributors to the event’

IN-HOUSE

This workshop and coaching is available for in-company delivery – just contact Peter to discuss your specific needs

The birth of a legend (possibly) …

December 8, 2019

Bollocks Picture Title.PNG

“It was an explosive meeting of minds at an international project management conference in Athens, Greece, in 2018, when two intellectual goliaths came together by chance only to realise that their paths were always destined to align in order to bring about a new brighter future for their chosen profession…”

“Bollocks” interrupted Susie.

“What?” responded Peter “I was just getting into my flow then, why did you stop me?”, he questioned.

“That was all bollocks wasn’t it” Susie sighed in an exasperated way, “intellectual giants, and alignment of destiny, explosive meetings and brighter future, all bollocks, totally and utterly”.

“So, what was it then?” asked Peter.

Susie quietly sighed and then explained, in a calm controlled tone, “We happened to be at the same conference, you lied on stage about winning an award, I called you out on it by subtly indicating I had actually won a real award, and you generally sulked for the rest of the morning and most of lunch if I remember correctly”.

“My memory is unclear on the actual details or timings” responded Peter, absolutely not sulking “but I know it was the point in time when ‘The Lazy Project Manager’ met ‘The Lesbian Project Manager’ (in your words) and the outcome of this meeting is this very book, so something happened for sure”.

“Now that isn’t bollocks” agreed Susie.

“Good, we are agreed” Peter smiled.

“Yes, we are” agreed Susie.

“The earth moved” Peter declared.

“No, it didn’t!” Susie rejected.

__________________________________________________________

And so was born a very special book, ‘Project Management: It’s all bollocks: The complete exposure of the world of, and the value of project management’ where two people who vaguely know each other and barely like each other will pick over the sadly inadequate and sometimes pathetic naked body of knowledge that is project management, and generally challenge just about everything, whilst openly laughing at some of the odder body parts.

It was all done in the best possible taste of course, with the intention of bringing a realistic understanding to current and future practitioners of change delivery about what it means to be a project manager today, next Tuesday and the future beyond even that.

‘Best possible taste’ is of course completely subjective but we are both sure the only reason you might be actually brave enough to pick up a copy of this book would be because a) it had a naughty word on the cover, b) it was bright pink, and c) you actually want to be both entertained and see your profession picked on mercilessly (just because you are, deep down, a rebel rousing project deviant even if your life exists in a world of ‘business casual’ and corporate compliance).

Even more than that we also live in the hope that you really want to learn what is actually important and what, to quote someone who shall remain absolutely nameless because she really doesn’t need any more encouragement on that front, is ‘bollocks’.

We are glad that we are all on the same page and that there is a beautiful alignment on the purpose of us writing this book and you, dear would-be reader, avidly consuming the contents of the same and making sure you tell each and every one of your work colleagues and friends about it. Hell, just slap it all over social media without a care in the world – we will live with the consequences (and hopefully royalties and speaking opportunities in exotic parts of the world) don’t you worry your little cotton socks about that at all.

On that bombshell of serendipitous happening the fun (and abuse) can begin!

__________________________________________________________

“Do we need a collective name?” asked Peter.

“A what?” exclaimed Susie.

“A collective name” Peter replied, “You know, a portmanteau if you like”.

“If you are going to use stupid long words in this book then I’m off, and most of the readers will probably join me” Susie declared in a grumpy tone.

“I just mean like ‘Brangelina’, when Brad and Angelina were together or when Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez got it on and became ‘Bennifer’ to the world at large” explained Peter.

“No” Susie instantly replied, “We don’t”.

Peter continued regardless “Like ‘Suspet’ or maybe ‘Petsu’, I quite like Petsu…”.

“No, let me repeat, we don’t” countered Susie in a much stronger tone “We are just writing a bloody book together and not entering some weird long-term relationship in any way, shape or form – clear?”.

“Clear” agreed Peter, “it is just that we will be in this book for quite a long time. I’m hoping for at least a second edition”.

“No” Susie glared, “we do not need a collective name now or ever, move on please”.

“OK” Peter sighed.

Susie and Peter (2019)

AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER NOWhttps://www.routledge.com/Project-Management-Its-All-Bollocks-The-Complete-Exposure-of-the-World/Palmer-Trew-Taylor/p/book/9780367140908

SHIPPING FROM 20th DECEMBER 2019

Technology Challenges

November 30, 2019

Now that you know you are in the ‘VUCA’ world can technology help in any way?

clarizen.master

The VUCA world challenges an organisation by:

  • Presenting boundaries for planning and policy management
  • Confounding the ability to make decisions in an accurate, relevant and timely manner
  • Confusing the recognition of issues that impact, as well as the consequences of such issues and any associated actions, along with their variables
  • Clouding the true interpretation of opportunities to grow

As we have already noted, Bill George, a senior fellow at Harvard Business School, puts the argument forward that VUCA demands a new leadership response which he calls VUCA 2.0: Vision, Understanding, Courage and Adaptability.

These are the basic foundations of a Business Agile world.

Equally there is an argument that to achieve this VUCA 2.0, or to Un-VUCA the VUCA world and enjoy the benefits of a world of Vision, Understanding, Courage and Adaptability, we can’t do it all on our own.

Technology is a major advantage in this world to grab that data, identify gaps and variabilities, to connect people all over the world to help make insightful suggestions and ultimately decisions, and bring about the power of the many.

These are also the basic foundations of a Business Agile world.

At which point we arrive back at the start by asking ‘What can my businesses do today to prepare for challenges of tomorrow and the future?’. The answer is ‘plenty’ but primarily ‘Get Business Agile’.

Webinar

Join myself and Neil Derbyshire from Clarizen on the morning of 5th December where we will address the 4 main challenges of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) and how working in a business agile mind-set can bring the rewards of stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your day-to-day work.

Join this free webinar to learn first-hand how:

  1. VUCA can be used as a catalyst to bringing change in your day-to-day world
  2. How a business agile mind-set will help bring stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your role
  3. How technology can help you overcome challenges in a VUCA world
  4. What can businesses do today to prepare for challenges in the future

Register your interest today to avoid VUCA now and in the future!

https://mkt.clarizen.com/webinar-register-how-to-become-business-agile-in-a-VUCA-world.html

Let’s Un-VUCA the VUCA world!

 

Peter Taylor is a change expert who has advised many other organisations on Change and Project strategy.

He is also the author of the number 1 bestselling project management book ‘The Lazy Project Manager’.

More information can be found at www.thelazyprojectmanager.com

The Complex World

November 25, 2019

Is your business life ‘Complex’?

Complex

Well don’t panic, you are certainly not alone, but you should accept that you are part the ‘VUCA’ world today!

C = Complexity: the multiplex of forces, the confounding of issues, no cause-and-effect chain and confusion that surrounds organization.

Meaning: Consisting of many different and connected parts – not easy to analyse or understand; complicated or intricate.

In a Forbes article ‘What Does VUCA Really Mean?’ Jeroen Kraaijenbrink writes: ‘Complexity refers to the number of factors that we need to take into account, their variety and the relationships between them. The more factors, the greater their variety and the more they are interconnected, the more complex an environment is. Under high complexity, it is impossible to fully analyze the environment and come to rational conclusions. The more complex the world is, the harder it is to analyze’.

The key here is whole messy interconnectedness of, it seems, everything to everything else.is not, necessarily, that any one point of connection is, in itself, complicated but that by connecting that point to another point, and both those points to each other, and then doing that over and over again many, many times that what you end up with a very scary looking piece of perceived ‘complexity’.

Harvard Business News noted, in an article called ‘Learning to Live with Complexity’ by Gökçe Surgut and Rita Gunther McGrath that there are two major problems of complexity (and you do need to know the difference between complicated and complex by the way). They said, ‘We’ve observed two problems commonly faced by managers of complex systems: unintended consequences and difficulty making sense of a situation’.

·       Unintended consequences: In a complex environment, even small decisions can have surprising effects.

·       Making sense of a situation: It is very difficult, if not impossible, for an individual decision maker to see an entire complex system. This is essentially a vantage point problem: It’s hard to observe and comprehend a highly diverse array of relationships from any one location.

So, the first concern is along the lines of ‘impact any one point and who knows what this might lead to’, which is a very worrying situation many would agree.

The second is that ‘nobody can actually see the big picture’ even though we have all been trained for years to ‘look at the big picture’, which is fine until now, because the picture itself cannot be seen in its entirety or ‘complexity’.

And so, the question has to be ‘How can we understand what can’t, apparently, been viewed?’.

Which leads us naturally to the appreciation that alone, we can’t. But in the company of the many, in the land of true collaboration, the impossible becomes more than possible thanks to our colleagues and compatriots at work.

Webinar

Join myself and Neil Derbyshire from Clarizen on the morning of 5th December where we will address the 4 main challenges of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) and how working in a business agile mind-set can bring the rewards of stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your day-to-day work.

Join this free webinar to learn first-hand how:

1.    VUCA can be used as a catalyst to bringing change in your day-to-day world

2.    How a business agile mind-set will help bring stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your role

3.    How technology can help you overcome challenges in a VUCA world

4.    What can businesses do today to prepare for challenges in the future

Register your interest today to avoid VUCA now and in the future!

https://mkt.clarizen.com/webinar-register-how-to-become-business-agile-in-a-VUCA-world.html

Let’s Un-VUCA the VUCA world!

Peter Taylor is a change expert who has advised many other organisations on Change and Project strategy.

He is also the author of the number 1 bestselling project management book ‘The Lazy Project Manager’.

More information can be found at www.thelazyprojectmanager.comThe Complex World

Repo

The Uncertain World

November 21, 2019

Is your business life ‘Uncertain’?

Uncertainty

Well don’t panic, you are certainly not alone, but you should accept that you are part the ‘VUCA’ world today!

U = Uncertainty: the lack of predictability, the prospects for surprise, and the sense of awareness and understanding of issues and events.

Meaning: Not able to be relied on; not known or definite.

In a Forbes article ‘What Does VUCA Really Mean?’ Jeroen Kraaijenbrink writes: ‘Uncertainty refers to the extent to which we can confidently predict the future. Part of uncertainty is perceived and associated with people’s inability to understand what is going on. Uncertainty, though, is also a more objective characteristic of an environment. Truly uncertain environments are those that don’t allow any prediction, also not on a statistical basis. The more uncertain the world is, the harder it is to predict’.

The key here is predictability, or the lack of it more to the point. We are creatures of habit and whilst we might demand change and expect change, we sure don’t want to have to change ourselves and that is all part of the uncertainty model in the VUCA world. The (almost) complete disappearance of any normality or certainty in what we do on a week by week, month by month, basis.

The optimistic would argue that when nothing is sure, everything is possible, which is true, but even the most extremely positive people can tire of constant uncertainty and continuous change that is not under their control.

The right, and only sane, approach to this I instead of trying to fight against it is to assess how we can embrace it. Because in uncertainty there is opportunity and not accepting such uncertainty will limit such opportunity.

The difficulty we, as humans, have is that our brains are wired to react with fear when we’re faced with uncertainty. It is just in a DNA; it is the fight or flight overrides that have always been with us. As uncertainty in a situation increases, then the brain shifts control over to the limbic system where our inbuilt emotions, such as fear, are generated. Basically, change worries us and uncertain or unplanned change worries us even more.

And so, the question has to be ‘How can we prepare ourselves to accept uncertainty and to move this towards certainty?’.

Addressing our core and natural reaction against uncertainty is a good place to begin, and then to identifying the positives, the opportunities through the cloud of uncertainty can bring us to a more stable and certain place.

It is about feeling that you are, in actual fact, in some sort of ‘control’.

Webinar

Join myself and Neil Derbyshire from Clarizen on the morning of 5th December where we will address the 4 main challenges of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) and how working in a business agile mind-set can bring the rewards of stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your day-to-day work.

Join this free webinar to learn first-hand how:

  1. VUCA can be used as a catalyst to bringing change in your day-to-day world
  2. How a business agile mind-set will help bring stability, certainty, simplicity and clarity to your role
  3. How technology can help you overcome challenges in a VUCA world
  4. What can businesses do today to prepare for challenges in the future

Register your interest today to avoid VUCA now and in the future!

https://mkt.clarizen.com/webinar-register-how-to-become-business-agile-in-a-VUCA-world.html

Let’s Un-VUCA the VUCA world!

 

Peter Taylor is a change expert who has advised many other organisations on Change and Project strategy.

He is also the author of the number 1 bestselling project management book ‘The Lazy Project Manager’.

More information can be found at www.thelazyprojectmanager.com